A successful migration

I migrated to the Raspberry Pi successfully. Most of the work was getting the Raspberry Pi back in working order after I accidentally broke the Raspbian installation with an incomplete update that paused right at the libc6 installation two weeks ago.

Most people will tell you that when things start to go awry and you don’t know why, just reinstall everything. The advice, while it may work, is incredibly unhelpful because they fail to understand all the work and reconfiguration that does not get magically copied over on reinstallation. I think it’s just a byproduct of today’s consumerist thinking: don’t bother repairing, just replace. Who cares where the broken stuff goes? The death of shop classes, as I had previously witnessed, is simply further evidence of this consumer culture.

And if you start whining, they’ll tell you to shut up, “managing a server yourself will take many hours,” “read this basic tutorial to the letter,” or “your posts show no research, get out.” And if you really do start making complicated arguments like the absence of fast reconfiguration on reinstall, they’ll tag out and bring in the intellectuals who will evangelize Docker and “write-as-you-go Bash scripts” at your face; “that, or consider paying someone to manage it for you.” What is more insulting than someone telling you outright that acquiring expertise is futile, and to simply give money that you don’t have to an “expert”?

Linux forums depress me, as the “pros” come off as, for lack of a better word, elitist. (There’s definitely a better word to describe them, but I can’t think of it right now.) Basically, if they don’t recognize you or your post count seems fairly low (less than 1,000), they’ll intentionally ask for information about your system beyond what is actually needed.

Anyway, back on topic. In short, I had to reinstall Raspbian, but I first had to back up the partition, which I thought I could do via SSH, but it seems that SSH would randomly halt with “Illegal instruction” around 20% of the way into the transfer. NOOBS doesn’t have SSH or any other file-transfer method (except netcat, maybe), so I just put the SD card in my laptop and transferred the files out. Then, I reinstalled Raspbian.

The configuration process was easier than I had originally conceived. You just install nginx, PHP, and MySQL (which is just a meta-package to install MariaDB – I didn’t know it was a drop-in replacement!), and then you copy in the site’s .conf file to /etc/nginx/sites-available and symlink it to /etc/nginx/sites-enabled. Next, you copy the site data to /srv/[site-name] – don’t copy to /var/www because that’s not the point of /var according to the Linux FHS (but packages aren’t allowed to automatically configure to /srv because the directory’s organization is at the sysadmin’s discretion). Finally, you make www-data take ownership of certain WordPress files, such as everything in wp-content and wp-config.php. To set up the database, just mysqldump¬†from the original server, transfer the query data over to the new server, and pass it as standard input. Don’t forget to re-create the WordPress database account.

Meanwhile, the PowerEdge 2600 is on the chopping block. DIMM bank 1 has been reporting an ECC fault since June, and ever since I restarted the server a few weeks ago, the first drive on the array has been reporting predictive failure, which will bring the array in degraded mode once it fails.

However, why should I put my entire server at the mercy of an SD card that can fail at any time? Hence, I should make a backup configuration now, before it is too late…

Update: I listened to the server spin down for its penultimate time: the PowerEdge has been shut down for good. The RPi has also been set up to perform daily backups of directories with user data and non-default config data on them.

I’ve sunk way too much time into this endeavor, and now I am very behind on my homework. I’ll have to work almost nonstop through the night if I want to get that homework done in time.

On top of that, now I must do a backup of the PowerEdge without arousing questions of what I actually used the server for. It’s almost disgusting how long I convinced myself to use that for, and how much money my dad probably ended up spending over the years just for power. A NAS would have been so much of a greater investment than that pile of junk; now the server is only worth the metal that it is made of.

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