The S9

I got an S9 from my father as part of a deal. I did not want the phone, but he got it anyway. This is a flagship device costing almost $1,000; not exactly a small step-up from the S4.

I have been trying not to get the phone dirty with my sweaty hands, but too late for that. It appears to be a well-built and well-designed phone, although it looks prone to damage without adequate casing.

I am not particularly fond of two things: materialism, and giving away random information to any app that wants it.

I mention materialism because nothing lasts forever – the S4, at its time, was the pinnacle of technology, but we have somehow advanced even further in five years. It is difficult to imagine what a phone will look like in five more years. One must also remember that the smartphone is an instrument designed to get things done – an integrated PDA and cell phone – although these days it serves more as a game console.

There are also immense privacy risks one is taking simply by using this phone. Android has grown to such tremendous complexity that even I, a programmer, cannot fully comprehend the full design of the Android system. There are also many more apps that grab the location, now that optimizations have been made to prevent battery overuse from obtaining a fine location. And the system has grown to become so tightly integrated that practically anything can access anything (if you allow it to).

The strongest aspect of this phone is its speed – whereas Google Maps takes 6 seconds to cold-start on my S4, it loads in about 1 to 1.5 seconds on the S9; essentially instantly.

Finally, this phone allows me to place “HD Voice,” “VoLTE,” “Wi-Fi,” and “HD Video” calls. All of these things seem to be exclusive to AT&T users, with a supported SIM card, with a supported phone (i.e. not an iPhone), in a supported location, on both sides. In essence, the feature is useless for 90% of calls[citation needed]. How much longer will it take to develop and adopt a high-quality communications infrastructure that is standard across all devices and all carriers, including iPhones? What ever happened to SIP – why didn’t Cingular give everyone a SIP address back in the day? Why do I have to use a cell phone to place a call using my number? Why do we still use numbers – when will we be able to switch to an alphanumeric format like e-mail addresses?

Yes, I understand that we have to maintain compatibility with older phones and landline via the PSTN – whatever that is these days – and we also have to maintain the reliability of 911 calls.

The walled-garden stubbornness of Apple does not help much, either. Apple simply stands back and laughs at the rest of the handset manufacturers and carriers, who are struggling to agree on common communication interfaces and protocols. Will Apple help? Nope. Their business thrives on discordance and failure among the other cell phone manufacturers to develop open standards. And when they finally agree on an open standard ten years later – yoink! – Apple adopts it instantly in response to the competition.

As for other features, I found the S9’s Smart Switch feature to work perfectly: it was able to migrate everything on my S4, even the things on my SD card (I recommend removing the SD card from the original phone before initiating a transfer). It did not ask me about ADB authorization or anything like that, so I wonder how it was able to accomplish a connection to the phone simply by unlocking it.

When Android will finally have a comprehensive backup and restore feature, however, remains beyond my knowledge. This is Android’s Achilles heel by far.

Oh, and I forgot one last thing about the S9: it has a headphone jack 🙂

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