Film piracy

The film is a captivating, immersive medium that narrates a story with a synchronized visual and audio track. In its similarity to television in that it can be consumed passively rather than requiring an active effort in imagination, movies have reached far more Americans than books. In the medium’s success, it has become a lucrative business over the past one hundred years.

Today, the majority of Americans know of only one type of movie: the movie that is approved by the Motion Picture Association of America, an industry group that comprises of six media conglomerates with near-exclusive access to what is commonly known as the movie theater.

The American has little access to the independent or international film; only has streaming eased the resistance of these films’ entry into the market, and even then their exposure to Americans is often filtered through contracts managed by the Big Six.

The end result is the offering of a relatively small catalog of extremely popular mainstream movies, whose distribution is tightly controlled from production to presentation. A consumer can watch an American movie only through a handful of means:

  • If still in theaters, an MPAA-approved facility.
  • Blu-ray disc, with an up-to-date Blu-ray player and a high-definition TV with HDCP.
  • DVD, with a player of the correct region, assuming that the movie was distributed by DVD.
  • A constellation of video-on-demand services, assuming the service has an up-to-date contract with the distributor:
    • Netflix
    • Amazon Prime Video
    • iTunes

Ironically, the battle was lost decades ago in the music industry, with purchased music distributed with no DRM.

The problem is that due to the increasing volume of media and the tightening demands by licensors to provide adequate protection for media, the film medium as a whole is becoming increasingly inaccessible. One can no longer go to the video store, find anything to one’s content, and pop it into the player: one must sift through a variety of providers to see who actually distributes the movie, at a variety of price points.

And what happens if the content is not accessible? What if the movie or the TV show is not accessible in one’s country due to contractual limitations? What if technological advances prevent one from enjoying purchased content? What if the content is no longer distributed by anyone?

These are reasons piracy is rationalized – not because it is in people’s willful intention to commit robbery, but because piracy has unfortunately made it far more convenient to acquire content than through a legitimate transaction. Content is easily searchable, and its results are displayed on a minimalistic table that lists every version of the content ever released. A few clicks later, and the content is downloaded as a file to one’s hard drive, and the download manager intelligently seeds the file back to its peers in a gesture of cooperation. The content (which, surprising to some, conforms to high quality standards) has already been decrypted, stripped of DRM, and is ready to be played back on virtually any device.

There is no question why the MPAA seeks to drill anti-piracy campaigns into the minds of Americans: because despite all of its efforts, and despite the illegality and unethical nature of piracy, the members of the MPAA have been unable to compete with the convenience of peer-to-peer downloading and DRM-free video.

For instance, suppose I wish to watch Cowboy Bebop: The Movie. While the movie’s theatrical reception was subpar, it is still original Cowboy Bebop content that is worth watching – like an extended episode. My ideal solution is to look it up on an ad-free, subscription-based streaming service such as Netflix, hit play, and then hit the “cast” button to any television in my house or even a monitor on my computer.

However, Cowboy Bebop: The Movie is not available. At all. Its only availability is through an obscure DVD release with varying prices, indicating that some DVDs are region-locked to Japan, while others can be played in the US.

Ultimately, the easiest way to play this is by searching it in a torrent database, downloading it, and then serving the file to the television.

It is the sad truth that despite having played movies from discs and boxes in my personal possession, purchasing high-quality content and then playing it from servers in my personal possession is frowned upon as piracy. (Ironically, even Apple designed this correctly: movies can be streamed either from other computers that have the downloaded content, or Apple’s own servers.)

Ultimately, piracy is a consequence of attempting to navigate a broken system of film distribution, and those astute enough to recognize this tend to pull away from mainstream media to enjoy more traditional media, such as books, which convey the same messages and experiences in more elegant terms.

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